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Two Towers Partly a boutique hotel and partly residential, the Two Towers is a perfect oval cut into two. While the oval cut has been inspired by a dance movement, the overall concept of the two towers has been inspired by two crescent moons, a significant symbol of Arabic culture. The facade screens, made from traditional Arabic motifs, enhance privacy, reduce direct sunlight and helps with natural ventilation. The scheme is composed of two nine storey buildings; a hotel and a residential block. The design is of the highest standards. The area is full of hotels and residential blocks, so the vision for the new edifice is to be iconic - with a more exciting design, in order to attract the visitors’ interest. A new landmark for the area based on an old Arabic symbol.
Pelican Hill Resort, New Port Beach, California,
SHOPPING CENTRE The concept behind the design of this shopping centre was initially inspired by the properties of ribbons. Ribbons are used, and have been used throughout history, in dance performances to enhance dance movements and here we have used the ribbon form to enhance the design. The walls and flooring are a reflection of an unfolding ribbon. The walls bend to create the balcony, and bend again to create the mezzanine, and finally the roof, in which the ribbons express this geometry.
Earl of Sandwich, Planet Holywood, Walt disney company, Anaheim, California.
Yacht - “The Dame” The concept was inspired from the spiral shape of a seashell, in particular a conch, which has been imitated in the shape and arrangement of the walls along with the shape of the staircase. Long strip lights line the walls to illuminate the space as well as imitate the distinctive striations that cover a seashell. Strip lights on the floor also illuminate the space and follow a fluvial pattern related to the movement of the yacht. The furniture also manifests a fluvial character in its parametric curves and shapes to give the entire space a fluid aesthetic.
Montessori School,Lake Forest, California,
Al Wahah Building The Al Wahah building is a multi-complex consisting of offices, a hotel , and retail all under the same roof. Divided by an atrium with a screening waterfall, flowing from the roof to the ground. The overall concept was based on the leaves of a palm tree, widely seen in Tripoli, with the facade and plan being developed by the concept. In the middle of the facade, there is an outline of a family which symbolises the reunion of Libyan families. The design of the building has allowed the division of the uses by a void separation leading to a garden on the ground floor. The screening waterfall has been cleverly added in order to create visual privacy between the hotel and the office area. All hotel rooms have been placed on the perimeter of the building. The office areas are open plan with the flexi-bility to be adopted and designed by the end users. The reception of the hotel is part of the ground floor retail area, inspired by the hotel design in the States. The organic shapes create a more harmonious form, the connections in between the spaces are more fluid and the design is elegant and comfortable.
Amorphous Club Amorphous is a Greek word that means Without a Shape. The restaurant breaks the boundaries of conventional interior design as the scenery can change in seconds, moving from a beach, to mountains, to a forest, creating an ever-changing scenic dining experience. This clever concept is unique and does not exist anywhere else in the world.
TOWER 42 The redesign of Tower 42 in London, a concept that has not been realised yet, has won 6 international awards and was featured in several magazines. The functionality of the new design is the expansion of the floorplates – the biggest design problem at the moment- through the introduction of a clever facade without the need to change the existing structure. This has been referred by many as a masterpiece of engineering. Due to the changing shapes, visitors of the area will interpret the building differently depending on which angle they viewed it from. At the moment the concrete core is surrounding by 3 existing cantileved leaves. Each leaf (A,B,C) is to work as a branch of the core. The new branches will create a spiral 3 dimensional movement inter connected to the core both vertically and horizontally; this will allow for constant movement changes giving maximum structural strength- the same way a pirouette works in the ballet world. The new facade is designed to carry the load to the ground floor, allowing for the larger floor plates to be increased by 30% making the tower more commercially viable. The internal areas will still be open plan, even if the new construction is blended with the old. Six new communal gardens are implemented to the design, assisting with the natural ventilation of the building and the occupants’ comfort, health and well-being. The concept is to create a sculpture through the unequal movements of the floor plates and the facade; is an improvising scheme. As for every piece of art, tries to see a moment in time.
Sea Front Hotel The Sea Front Hotel project is located in Libya and is half a kilometre long. The project includes a business hotel, cafés, restaurants, retail spaces, and recreational areas. The overall concept is inspired by a tree leaf and each hotel room is elegantly innovative. The hotel design has been awarded several times and the room has been on the front page of Build Magazine in Dec 2015.
Museum The concept of the museum takes inspiration from the word “Promenade” and offers the promenade experience to the visitors by following a continuous path that does not cross twice exactly like a dance choreography. This translates into a scheme offering a journey of cultural knowledge. With no straight edges, this innovative design contains a restaurant on the bridge offering amazing views of the sea and cityscape. The structure of this inspiring building is designed in glulam timber; creatively showcasing one of the most sustainable construction materials. The structural frame, internal walls and insulation create a natural carbon sink, resulting in a flexible, lightweight and modular building. The scheme reaches zero carbon emissions by careful selection and sourcing of products and the integration of passive and active sustainable energy. The building will create more energy than it consumes and additionally pay back the embodied carbon of construction.
Naqqaza Hotel Resort The site is about 2 kilometres away from the seafront and overlooks a purely natural and unspoiled beach. This luxury resort’s masterplan was inspired by Roman cities and is formed of villas and a large hotel creating a town in itself with all the luxury amenities within. The shape of the villas is organic, inspired by the surrounding environment and the local cultivations. The idea is to create a place for healing, regenerate, rejuvenate and detoxification. Quality Family time or pure relaxation will be the fore-most reasons to visit this resort. The site is 12,000m2. The villas are one or two storeys in order to minimise the impact on the natural environment and maximise the number of villas on site. Every villa has its own private garden and pool. Guests have the option of staying in a villa or the hotel. Restaurants, shops, cafes and every kind of amenity are included in the resort in the form of a Roman Agora. Micro-pilling and environmental friendly techniques are to be used for the construction of the resort in order to minimize the impact on the natural environment.
Centre of Peace & Religion The design was based on the division of spaces to pray and interaction areas. The entire area is interchangeable through a flowing movement (graduation of space; from large spaces to smaller and vice versa) and connected with each other. Internal and external atriums are used as interaction areas for the visitors. The highest point is the iconic tower which works as a point of reference for the surrounding district. The parametric design derived from a dance choreography creating a uniformed structure. The Centre of Peace and Religion in Battersea is the first competition Debbie Flevotomou Architects participated in, which was awarded first place for the design. The brief was to design a building where different religions would be able to co-exist harmoniously and visitors would be able to interact with each other under the same roof. The design appears abstract, monumental and sculptural like a piece of art. Internally, the interaction of light contributes as an important design factor. Historically the indirect light has been widely used in spiritual spaces. In this case, the building has glass roofs. The internal areas are bright and atmospheric. Trees and internal gardens contribute to the relaxation and comfort for all visitors.
Birmingham School of Dance The design was developed from the Tarantella Ballet Dance. The purpose was to create beautiful and elegant spaces where the form has been given by the movement of the dance. The columns, roof, and every structural element follow the pattern of the dance as if the building itself is dancing. The design translates the movement of the dance, from the ground the walls spiral up and continue to do so merging and giving the illusion of lifted floor plates, which in ends at the roof. The roof supports the curtain wall of the lifted floor. The fluidity of space makes the building appear to move. The ground floor is divided into three buildings with a public plaza at the front and a large garden area at the back, open to the public. The dance school celebrates the public realm: gives something back to the city. Stairs lead up to the roof offering breath taking views. The whole building is connected to the first floor. Monumental stairs lead the visitors to the vast auditorium, which is at the centre just as the Grand Allegro of the dance.
1 BERKELEY STREET, MAYFAIR, LONDON,W1J 8DJ T: +44(0)20 3592 0537 E: INFO@DEBBIEFLEVOTOMOU.COM

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Private Policy Debbie Flevotomou Architects LTD Partly a boutique hotel and partly residential, the Two Towers is a perfect oval cut into two.
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Two Towers Partly a boutique hotel and partly residential, the Two Towers is a perfect oval cut into two. While the oval cut has been inspired by a dance movement, the overall concept of the two towers has been inspired by two crescent moons, a significant symbol of Arabic culture. The facade screens, made from traditional Arabic motifs, enhance privacy, reduce direct sunlight and helps with natural ventilation. The scheme is composed of two nine storey buildings; a hotel and a residential block. The design is of the highest standards. The area is full of hotels and residential blocks, so the vision for the new edifice is to be iconic - with a more exciting design, in order to attract the visitors’ interest. A new landmark for the area based on an old Arabic symbol.
Pelican Hill Resort, New Port Beach, California,
SHOPPING CENTRE The concept behind the design of this shopping centre was initially inspired by the properties of ribbons. Ribbons are used, and have been used throughout history, in dance performances to enhance dance movements and here we have used the ribbon form to enhance the design. The walls and flooring are a reflection of an unfolding ribbon. The walls bend to create the balcony, and bend again to create the mezzanine, and finally the roof, in which the ribbons express this geometry.
Earl of Sandwich, Planet Holywood, Walt disney company, Anaheim, California.
Yacht - “The Dame” The concept was inspired from the spiral shape of a seashell, in particular a conch, which has been imitated in the shape and arrangement of the walls along with the shape of the staircase. Long strip lights line the walls to illuminate the space as well as imitate the distinctive striations that cover a seashell. Strip lights on the floor also illuminate the space and follow a fluvial pattern related to the movement of the yacht. The furniture also manifests a fluvial character in its parametric curves and shapes to give the entire space a fluid aesthetic.
Montessori School,Lake Forest, California,
Al Wahah Building The Al Wahah building is a multi-complex consisting of offices, a hotel , and retail all under the same roof. Divided by an atrium with a screening waterfall, flowing from the roof to the ground. The overall concept was based on the leaves of a palm tree, widely seen in Tripoli, with the facade and plan being developed by the concept. In the middle of the facade, there is an outline of a family which symbolises the reunion of Libyan families. The design of the building has allowed the division of the uses by a void separation leading to a garden on the ground floor. The screening waterfall has been cleverly added in order to create visual privacy between the hotel and the office area. All hotel rooms have been placed on the perimeter of the building. The office areas are open plan with the flexi-bility to be adopted and designed by the end users. The reception of the hotel is part of the ground floor retail area, inspired by the hotel design in the States. The organic shapes create a more harmonious form, the connections in between the spaces are more fluid and the design is elegant and comfortable.
Amorphous Club Amorphous is a Greek word that means Without a Shape. The restaurant breaks the boundaries of conventional interior design as the scenery can change in seconds, moving from a beach, to mountains, to a forest, creating an ever-changing scenic dining experience. This clever concept is unique and does not exist anywhere else in the world.
TOWER 42 The redesign of Tower 42 in London, a concept that has not been realised yet, has won 6 international awards and was featured in several magazines. The functionality of the new design is the expansion of the floorplates – the biggest design problem at the moment- through the introduction of a clever facade without the need to change the existing structure. This has been referred by many as a masterpiece of engineering. Due to the changing shapes, visitors of the area will interpret the building differently depending on which angle they viewed it from. At the moment the concrete core is surrounding by 3 existing cantileved leaves. Each leaf (A,B,C) is to work as a branch of the core. The new branches will create a spiral 3 dimensional movement inter connected to the core both vertically and horizontally; this will allow for constant movement changes giving maximum structural strength- the same way a pirouette works in the ballet world. The new facade is designed to carry the load to the ground floor, allowing for the larger floor plates to be increased by 30% making the tower more commercially viable. The internal areas will still be open plan, even if the new construction is blended with the old. Six new communal gardens are implemented to the design, assisting with the natural ventilation of the building and the occupants’ comfort, health and well-being. The concept is to create a sculpture through the unequal movements of the floor plates and the facade; is an improvising scheme. As for every piece of art, tries to see a moment in time.
Sea Front Hotel The Sea Front Hotel project is located in Libya and is half a kilometre long. The project includes a business hotel, cafés, restaurants, retail spaces, and recreational areas. The overall concept is inspired by a tree leaf and each hotel room is elegantly innovative. The hotel design has been awarded several times and the room has been on the front page of Build Magazine in Dec 2015.
Museum The concept of the museum takes inspiration from the word “Promenade” and offers the promenade experience to the visitors by following a continuous path that does not cross twice exactly like a dance choreography. This translates into a scheme offering a journey of cultural knowledge. With no straight edges, this innovative design contains a restaurant on the bridge offering amazing views of the sea and cityscape. The structure of this inspiring building is designed in glulam timber; creatively showcasing one of the most sustainable construction materials. The structural frame, internal walls and insulation create a natural carbon sink, resulting in a flexible, lightweight and modular building. The scheme reaches zero carbon emissions by careful selection and sourcing of products and the integration of passive and active sustainable energy. The building will create more energy than it consumes and additionally pay back the embodied carbon of construction.
Naqqaza Hotel Resort The site is about 2 kilometres away from the seafront and overlooks a purely natural and unspoiled beach. This luxury resort’s masterplan was inspired by Roman cities and is formed of villas and a large hotel creating a town in itself with all the luxury amenities within. The shape of the villas is organic, inspired by the surrounding environment and the local cultivations. The idea is to create a place for healing, regenerate, rejuvenate and detoxification. Quality Family time or pure relaxation will be the fore-most reasons to visit this resort. The site is 12,000m2. The villas are one or two storeys in order to minimise the impact on the natural environment and maximise the number of villas on site. Every villa has its own private garden and pool. Guests have the option of staying in a villa or the hotel. Restaurants, shops, cafes and every kind of amenity are included in the resort in the form of a Roman Agora. Micro-pilling and environmental friendly techniques are to be used for the construction of the resort in order to minimize the impact on the natural environment.
Centre of Peace & Religion The design was based on the division of spaces to pray and interaction areas. The entire area is interchangeable through a flowing movement (graduation of space; from large spaces to smaller and vice versa) and connected with each other. Internal and external atriums are used as interaction areas for the visitors. The highest point is the iconic tower which works as a point of reference for the surrounding district. The parametric design derived from a dance choreography creating a uniformed structure. The Centre of Peace and Religion in Battersea is the first competition Debbie Flevotomou Architects participated in, which was awarded first place for the design. The brief was to design a building where different religions would be able to co-exist harmoniously and visitors would be able to interact with each other under the same roof. The design appears abstract, monumental and sculptural like a piece of art. Internally, the interaction of light contributes as an important design factor. Historically the indirect light has been widely used in spiritual spaces. In this case, the building has glass roofs. The internal areas are bright and atmospheric. Trees and internal gardens contribute to the relaxation and comfort for all visitors.
Birmingham School of Dance The design was developed from the Tarantella Ballet Dance. The purpose was to create beautiful and elegant spaces where the form has been given by the movement of the dance. The columns, roof, and every structural element follow the pattern of the dance as if the building itself is dancing. The design translates the movement of the dance, from the ground the walls spiral up and continue to do so merging and giving the illusion of lifted floor plates, which in ends at the roof. The roof supports the curtain wall of the lifted floor. The fluidity of space makes the building appear to move. The ground floor is divided into three buildings with a public plaza at the front and a large garden area at the back, open to the public. The dance school celebrates the public realm: gives something back to the city. Stairs lead up to the roof offering breath taking views. The whole building is connected to the first floor. Monumental stairs lead the visitors to the vast auditorium, which is at the centre just as the Grand Allegro of the dance.
1 BERKELEY STREET, MAYFAIR, LONDON,W1J 8DJ T: +44(0)20 3592 0537 E: INFO@DEBBIEFLEVOTOMOU.COM
Private Policy Debbie Flevotomou Architects LTD Partly a boutique hotel and partly residential, the Two Towers is a perfect oval cut into two.
Two Towers Partly a boutique hotel and partly residential, the Two Towers is a perfect oval cut into two. While the oval cut has been inspired by a dance movement, the overall concept of the two towers has been inspired by two crescent moons, a significant symbol of Arabic culture. The facade screens, made from traditional Arabic motifs, enhance privacy, reduce direct sunlight and helps with natural ventilation. The scheme is composed of two nine storey buildings; a hotel and a residential block. The design is of the highest standards. The area is full of hotels and residential blocks, so the vision for the new edifice is to be iconic - with a more exciting design, in order to attract the visitors’ interest. A new landmark for the area based on an old Arabic symbol.
Pelican Hill Resort, New Port Beach, California,
SHOPPING CENTRE The concept behind the design of this shopping centre was initially inspired by the properties of ribbons. Ribbons are used, and have been used throughout history, in dance performances to enhance dance movements and here we have used the ribbon form to enhance the design. The walls and flooring are a reflection of an unfolding ribbon. The walls bend to create the balcony, and bend again to create the mezzanine, and finally the roof, in which the ribbons express this geometry.
Earl of Sandwich, Planet Holywood, Walt disney company, Anaheim, California.
Yacht - “The Dame” The concept was inspired from the spiral shape of a seashell, in particular a conch, which has been imitated in the shape and arrangement of the walls along with the shape of the staircase. Long strip lights line the walls to illuminate the space as well as imitate the distinctive striations that cover a seashell. Strip lights on the floor also illuminate the space and follow a fluvial pattern related to the movement of the yacht. The furniture also manifests a fluvial character in its parametric curves and shapes to give the entire space a fluid aesthetic.
Montessori School,Lake Forest, California,
Al Wahah Building The Al Wahah building is a multi-complex consisting of offices, a hotel , and retail all under the same roof. Divided by an atrium with a screening waterfall, flowing from the roof to the ground. The overall concept was based on the leaves of a palm tree, widely seen in Tripoli, with the facade and plan being developed by the concept. In the middle of the facade, there is an outline of a family which symbolises the reunion of Libyan families. The design of the building has allowed the division of the uses by a void separation leading to a garden on the ground floor. The screening waterfall has been cleverly added in order to create visual privacy between the hotel and the office area. All hotel rooms have been placed on the perimeter of the building. The office areas are open plan with the flexi-bility to be adopted and designed by the end users. The reception of the hotel is part of the ground floor retail area, inspired by the hotel design in the States. The organic shapes create a more harmonious form, the connections in between the spaces are more fluid and the design is elegant and comfortable.
Amorphous Club Amorphous is a Greek word that means Without a Shape. The restaurant breaks the boundaries of conventional interior design as the scenery can change in seconds, moving from a beach, to mountains, to a forest, creating an ever-changing scenic dining experience. This clever concept is unique and does not exist anywhere else in the world.
TOWER 42 The redesign of Tower 42 in London, a concept that has not been realised yet, has won 6 international awards and was featured in several magazines. The functionality of the new design is the expansion of the floorplates – the biggest design problem at the moment- through the introduction of a clever facade without the need to change the existing structure. This has been referred by many as a masterpiece of engineering. Due to the changing shapes, visitors of the area will interpret the building differently depending on which angle they viewed it from. At the moment the concrete core is surrounding by 3 existing cantileved leaves. Each leaf (A,B,C) is to work as a branch of the core. The new branches will create a spiral 3 dimensional movement inter connected to the core both vertically and horizontally; this will allow for constant movement changes giving maximum structural strength- the same way a pirouette works in the ballet world. The new facade is designed to carry the load to the ground floor, allowing for the larger floor plates to be increased by 30% making the tower more commercially viable. The internal areas will still be open plan, even if the new construction is blended with the old. Six new communal gardens are implemented to the design, assisting with the natural ventilation of the building and the occupants’ comfort, health and well-being. The concept is to create a sculpture through the unequal movements of the floor plates and the facade; is an improvising scheme. As for every piece of art, tries to see a moment in time.
Sea Front Hotel The Sea Front Hotel project is located in Libya and is half a kilometre long. The project includes a business hotel, cafés, restaurants, retail spaces, and recreational areas. The overall concept is inspired by a tree leaf and each hotel room is elegantly innovative. The hotel design has been awarded several times and the room has been on the front page of Build Magazine in Dec 2015.
Museum The concept of the museum takes inspiration from the word “Promenade” and offers the promenade experience to the visitors by following a continuous path that does not cross twice exactly like a dance choreography. This translates into a scheme offering a journey of cultural knowledge. With no straight edges, this innovative design contains a restaurant on the bridge offering amazing views of the sea and cityscape. The structure of this inspiring building is designed in glulam timber; creatively showcasing one of the most sustainable construction materials. The structural frame, internal walls and insulation create a natural carbon sink, resulting in a flexible, lightweight and modular building. The scheme reaches zero carbon emissions by careful selection and sourcing of products and the integration of passive and active sustainable energy. The building will create more energy than it consumes and additionally pay back the embodied carbon of construction.
Naqqaza Hotel Resort The site is about 2 kilometres away from the seafront and overlooks a purely natural and unspoiled beach. This luxury resort’s masterplan was inspired by Roman cities and is formed of villas and a large hotel creating a town in itself with all the luxury amenities within. The shape of the villas is organic, inspired by the surrounding environment and the local cultivations. The idea is to create a place for healing, regenerate, rejuvenate and detoxification. Quality Family time or pure relaxation will be the fore-most reasons to visit this resort. The site is 12,000m2. The villas are one or two storeys in order to minimise the impact on the natural environment and maximise the number of villas on site. Every villa has its own private garden and pool. Guests have the option of staying in a villa or the hotel. Restaurants, shops, cafes and every kind of amenity are included in the resort in the form of a Roman Agora. Micro-pilling and environmental friendly techniques are to be used for the construction of the resort in order to minimize the impact on the natural environment.
Centre of Peace & Religion The design was based on the division of spaces to pray and interaction areas. The entire area is interchangeable through a flowing movement (graduation of space; from large spaces to smaller and vice versa) and connected with each other. Internal and external atriums are used as interaction areas for the visitors. The highest point is the iconic tower which works as a point of reference for the surrounding district. The parametric design derived from a dance choreography creating a uniformed structure. The Centre of Peace and Religion in Battersea is the first competition Debbie Flevotomou Architects participated in, which was awarded first place for the design. The brief was to design a building where different religions would be able to co-exist harmoniously and visitors would be able to interact with each other under the same roof. The design appears abstract, monumental and sculptural like a piece of art. Internally, the interaction of light contributes as an important design factor. Historically the indirect light has been widely used in spiritual spaces. In this case, the building has glass roofs. The internal areas are bright and atmospheric. Trees and internal gardens contribute to the relaxation and comfort for all visitors.
Birmingham School of Dance The design was developed from the Tarantella Ballet Dance. The purpose was to create beautiful and elegant spaces where the form has been given by the movement of the dance. The columns, roof, and every structural element follow the pattern of the dance as if the building itself is dancing. The design translates the movement of the dance, from the ground the walls spiral up and continue to do so merging and giving the illusion of lifted floor plates, which in ends at the roof. The roof supports the curtain wall of the lifted floor. The fluidity of space makes the building appear to move. The ground floor is divided into three buildings with a public plaza at the front and a large garden area at the back, open to the public. The dance school celebrates the public realm: gives something back to the city. Stairs lead up to the roof offering breath taking views. The whole building is connected to the first floor. Monumental stairs lead the visitors to the vast auditorium, which is at the centre just as the Grand Allegro of the dance.
1 BERKELEY STREET, MAYFAIR, LONDON,W1J 8DJ T: +44(0)20 3592 0537 E: INFO@DEBBIEFLEVOTOMOU.COM
Private Policy Debbie Flevotomou Architects LTD Partly a boutique hotel and partly residential, the Two Towers is a perfect oval cut into two.